iiBig 10th Annual Education Finance & Loan Symposium

Last week, Joseph Cioffi was a featured speaker at the iiBig 10th Annual Education Finance & Loan Symposium in Alexandria, Virginia.  He participated in a panel regarding the latest trends and issues impacting collections and also moderated a panel on valuation and trends in student loan securitizations.  Below, he shares key takeaways from the conference and shares insights from his fellow panelists.

The conference was highly informative, including the insights of the experts on the valuation panel: Rosemary Kelley, Senior Managing Director at Kroll Bond Rating Agency;…

Usury has made quite a comeback from the dust heap of old law treatises to become a crucial concept that has shaped modern credit markets. It recently returned to public awareness in marketplace lending, where online lenders have avoided making loans in states comprising the Second Circuit, such as New York, due to an unfavorable usury decision. Now, light has been shed on subprime auto financing and an exception to usury laws that’s creating risk for an already shaky market.

Usury: It’s An Old Concept …

New York’s usury laws were put on the books as early as 1787 to protect desperate borrowers from being preyed upon by unscrupulous lenders who use that desperation as leverage….

New Tech, New Risks

There are always risks to forging a new path. When it comes to electric vehicles (EVs) like the Model S and Model X that back Tesla’s latest deal, there are peculiar risks beyond those that normally accompany auto asset-backed securities (ABS). Given a lack of historical data, there is the risk of uncertain residual or resale values, and moreover, the potential for those values to fall below expectations for any number of reasons. For example, new technology may emerge that leapfrogs the manufacturer’s current offering, or production start-up problems may prevent the manufacturer from fulfilling demand….

For all the talk about Dreamers in the national immigration debate, a recent research paper positing the positive effect of erasing the nation’s $1.3 trillion student debt burden has given the term new meaning.  If someone could wave a magic wand and make student loan debt disappear, we would hear the collective cheers of student borrowers all the way to the moon.  But rather than treat such an act like a fairy tale, a group of economists here on earth went about determining the kind of economic impact a massive cancellation of student debt would have.  …

As we said in our last post regarding vulnerability in credit enhancements and litigation risk, subprime auto ABS investors have historically slept easy in light of ample credit enhancements that have provided a protective cushion from losses. Based on the reactions, it seems some have been stirred from their slumber. The question now is what’s next?  Will market participants, after kicking the tires, find reason for alarm or will they hit the “snooze” button and go back to sleep? To paraphrase the Bard, “Aye, there’s the rub – for in that sleep what dreams may come.”

Several events have occurred recently warranting a recalculation of the Subprime Auto Loan Crisis Chronometer’s measurement of the overall risk of loss allocation battles. …